Helmholtz Gemeinschaft

Search
Browse
Statistics
Feeds

Imidazole propionate is increased in diabetes and associated with dietary patterns and altered microbial ecology

[img]
Preview
PDF (Original Article) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
1MB
[img] Other (Supplementary Information)
6MB

Item Type:Article
Title:Imidazole propionate is increased in diabetes and associated with dietary patterns and altered microbial ecology
Creators Name:Molinaro, A. and Bel Lassen, P. and Henricsson, M. and Wu, H. and Adriouch, S. and Belda, E. and Chakaroun, R. and Nielsen, T. and Bergh, P.O. and Rouault, C. and André, S. and Marquet, F. and Andreelli, F. and Salem, J.E. and Assmann, K. and Bastard, J.P. and Forslund, S. and Le Chatelier, E. and Falony, G. and Pons, N. and Prifti, E. and Quinquis, B. and Roume, H. and Vieira-Silva, S. and Hansen, T.H. and Pedersen, H.K. and Lewinter, C. and Sønderskov, N.B. and Køber, L. and Vestergaard, H. and Hansen, T. and Zucker, J.D. and Galan, P. and Dumas, M.E. and Raes, J. and Oppert, J.M. and Letunic, I. and Nielsen, J. and Bork, P. and Ehrlich, S.D. and Stumvoll, M. and Pedersen, O. and Aron-Wisneswky, J. and Clément, K. and Bäckhed, F.
Abstract:Microbiota-host-diet interactions contribute to the development of metabolic diseases. Imidazole propionate is a novel microbially produced metabolite from histidine, which impairs glucose metabolism. Here, we show that subjects with prediabetes and diabetes in the MetaCardis cohort from three European countries have elevated serum imidazole propionate levels. Furthermore, imidazole propionate levels were increased in subjects with low bacterial gene richness and Bacteroides 2 enterotype, which have previously been associated with obesity. The Bacteroides 2 enterotype was also associated with increased abundance of the genes involved in imidazole propionate biosynthesis from dietary histidine. Since patients and controls did not differ in their histidine dietary intake, the elevated levels of imidazole propionate in type 2 diabetes likely reflects altered microbial metabolism of histidine, rather than histidine intake per se. Thus the microbiota may contribute to type 2 diabetes by generating imidazole propionate that can modulate host inflammation and metabolism.
Source:Nature Communications
ISSN:2041-1723
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
Volume:11
Number:1
Page Range:5881
Date:18 November 2020
Official Publication:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19589-w
PubMed:View item in PubMed

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Open Access
MDC Library