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Developmental origin and maintenance of distinct testicular macrophage populations

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Item Type:Article
Title:Developmental origin and maintenance of distinct testicular macrophage populations
Creators Name:Mossadegh-Keller, N. and Gentek, R. and Gimenez, G. and Bigot, S. and Mailfert, S. and Sieweke, M.H.
Abstract:Testicular macrophages (tM{phi}) are the principal immune cells of the mammalian testis. Beyond classical immune functions, they have been shown to be important for organogenesis, spermatogenesis, and male hormone production. In the adult testis, two different macrophage populations have been identified based on their distinct tissue localization and morphology, but their developmental origin and mode of homeostatic maintenance are unknown. In this study, we use genetic lineage-tracing models and adoptive transfer protocols to address this question. We show that embryonic progenitors give rise to the interstitial macrophage population, whereas peritubular macrophages are exclusively seeded postnatally in the prepuberty period from bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitors. As the proliferative capacity of interstitial macrophages declines, BM progenitors also contribute to this population. Once established, both the peritubular and interstitial macrophage populations exhibit a long life span and a low turnover in the steady state. Our observations identify distinct developmental pathways for two different tM{phi} populations that have important implications for the further dissection of their distinct roles in organ homeostasis and testicular function.
Source:Journal of Experimental Medicine
ISSN:0022-1007
Publisher:Rockefeller University Press (U.S.A.)
Volume:214
Number:10
Page Range:2829-2041
Date:2 October 2017
Official Publication:https://doi.org/10.1084/jem.20170829
PubMed:View item in PubMed

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