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Muscle contraction is required to maintain the pool of muscle progenitors via YAP and NOTCH during fetal myogenesis

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Item Type:Article
Title:Muscle contraction is required to maintain the pool of muscle progenitors via YAP and NOTCH during fetal myogenesis
Creators Name:Esteves de Lima, J. and Bonnin, M.A. and Birchmeier, C. and Duprez, D.
Abstract:The importance of mechanical activity in the regulation of muscle progenitors during chick development has not been investigated. We show that immobilization decreases NOTCH activity and mimics a NOTCH loss-of-function phenotype, a reduction in the number of muscle progenitors and increased differentiation. Ligand-induced NOTCH activation prevents the reduction of muscle progenitors and the increase of differentiation upon immobilization. Inhibition of NOTCH ligand activity in muscle fibers suffices to reduce the progenitor pool. Furthermore, immobilization reduces the activity of the transcriptional co-activator YAP and the expression of the NOTCH ligand JAG2 in muscle fibers. YAP forced activity in muscle fibers prevents the decrease of JAG2 expression and the number of PAX7+ cells in immobilization conditions. Our results identify a novel mechanism acting downstream of muscle contraction, where YAP activates JAG2 expression in muscle fibers, which in turn regulates the pool of fetal muscle progenitors via NOTCH in a non cell-autonomous manner.
Keywords:Chick Embryo, Developmental Gene Expression Regulation, Jagged-2 Protein, Muscle Contraction, Muscle Development, Notch Receptors, Stem Cells, Trans-Activators, Animals
Source:eLife
ISSN:2050-084X
Publisher:eLife Sciences Publications (U.K.)
Volume:5
Page Range:e15593
Date:24 August 2016
Official Publication:https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15593
PubMed:View item in PubMed

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