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The impact of self-reported childhood trauma on emotion regulation in borderline personality disorder and major depression

Item Type:Article
Title:The impact of self-reported childhood trauma on emotion regulation in borderline personality disorder and major depression
Creators Name:Carvalho Fernando, S. and Beblo, T. and Schlosser, N. and Terfehr, K. and Otte, C. and Loewe, B. and Wolf, O.T. and Spitzer, C. and Driessen, M. and Wingenfeld, K.
Abstract:Early life stress is said to play a critical role in the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), but the underlying mediating factors remain uncertain. This study aimed to investigate self-reported childhood trauma, emotion regulation difficulties, and their associations in a sample of BPD (n = 49) and MDD (n = 48) patients and healthy control participants (n = 63). Multiple regressions were used to evaluate the impact of the quality and severity of self-reported childhood trauma on self-reported emotion regulation. The results supported an association between self-reported maltreatment experiences, especially emotional abuse and neglect, and emotion regulation difficulties. Additional analyses showed that emotion regulation difficulties influence the association between self-reported emotional abuse and acute symptomatology in the BPD subgroup. Emotion regulation difficulties may be 1 pathway through which early life stress, particularly emotional abuse, increases the risk for developing BPD symptomatology.
Keywords:Childhood Trauma, Emotion Regulation, Borderline Personality Disorder, Major Depression
Source:Journal of Trauma & Dissociation
ISSN:1529-9732
Publisher:Taylor & Francis (U.K.)
Volume:15
Number:4
Page Range:384-401
Date:30 June 2014
Official Publication:https://doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2013.863262
PubMed:View item in PubMed

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