Helmholtz Gemeinschaft

Search
Browse
Statistics
Feeds

Effect of current and lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder on 24-h urinary catecholamines and cortisol: results from the Mind Your Heart Study

Item Type:Article
Title:Effect of current and lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder on 24-h urinary catecholamines and cortisol: results from the Mind Your Heart Study
Creators Name:Wingenfeld, K. and Whooley, M.A. and Neylan, T.C. and Otte, C. and Cohen, B.E.
Abstract:Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and several other chronic illnesses. Alterations in the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in PTSD might contribute to these associations but findings regarding SNS and HPA activity in PTSD are heterogeneous. We measured 24-h urinary catecholamines and cortisol in a large cohort of adult outpatients recruited from 2 Veterans Affairs medical centers. 24-h urinary norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and cortisol were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Lifetime and current PTSD were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale using DSM-IV-TR criteria. Out of 613 participants, 199 (32.5%) had current PTSD, 100 (16.3%) had lifetime but not current PTSD, and 314 (51.2%) never had PTSD. Patients with current PTSD had significantly higher norepinephrine secretion compared to those without PTSD. Patients in the lifetime PTSD group exhibited lower cortisol values compared to those without PTSD. Participants who never had PTSD showed the lowest norepinephrine and the highest cortisol values. All results remained stable when controlling for potentially confounding variables. This study provides evidence for increased norepinephrine secretion and decreased cortisol in PTSD. Future longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether these changes contribute to adverse health outcomes in patients with PTSD.
Keywords:Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Catecholamines, Norepinephrine, Cortisol, Cardiovascular Disease
Source:Psychoneuroendocrinology
ISSN:0306-4530
Publisher:Elsevier (U.K.)
Volume:52
Page Range:83-91
Date:February 2015
Official Publication:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.10.023
PubMed:View item in PubMed

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Open Access
MDC Library