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Overexpression of human wild-type FUS causes progressive motor neuron degeneration in an age- and dose-dependent fashion

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Item Type:Article
Title:Overexpression of human wild-type FUS causes progressive motor neuron degeneration in an age- and dose-dependent fashion
Creators Name:Mitchell, J.C. and McGoldrick, P. and Vance, C. and Hortobagyi, T. and Sreedharan, J. and Rogelj, B. and Tudor, E.L. and Smith, B.N. and Klasen, C. and Miller, C.C.J. and Cooper, J.D. and Greensmith, L. and Shaw, C.E.
Abstract:Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorders with overlapping clinical, genetic and pathological features. Cytoplasmic inclusions of fused in sarcoma (FUS) are the hallmark of several forms of FTLD and ALS patients with mutations in the FUS gene. FUS is a multifunctional, predominantly nuclear, DNA and RNA binding protein. Here, we report that transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type human FUS develop an aggressive phenotype with an early onset tremor followed by progressive hind limb paralysis and death by 12 weeks in homozygous animals. Large motor neurons were lost from the spinal cord accompanied by neurophysiological evidence of denervation and focal muscle atrophy. Surviving motor neurons in the spinal cord had greatly increased cytoplasmic expression of FUS, with globular and skein-like FUS-positive and ubiquitin-negative inclusions associated with astroglial and microglial reactivity. Cytoplasmic FUS inclusions were also detected in the brain of transgenic mice without apparent neuronal loss and little astroglial or microglial activation. Hemizygous FUS overexpressing mice showed no evidence of a motor phenotype or pathology. These findings recapitulate several pathological features seen in human ALS and FTLD patients, and suggest that overexpression of wild-type FUS in vulnerable neurons may be one of the root causes of disease. Furthermore, these mice will provide a new model to study disease mechanism, and test therapies.
Source:Acta Neuropathologica
ISSN:0001-6322
Publisher:Springer (Germany)
Volume:125
Number:2
Page Range:273-288
Date:February 2013
Official Publication:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00401-012-1043-z
PubMed:View item in PubMed

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